Dr. Inke Du Bois

 

Working Areas

Humor in Digitaler Kommunikation| Linguistische Diskriminierung von Akzenten|Sprache und Sport| Gender und Diversity Trainings| Diskursanalyse|Interkulturelle Kommunikation|Gender und Sprache|Antidiskriminierung

 

Humor in Digital Communication|Linguistic Discrimination of Accents|Language and Sports| Gender and Diversity Trainings| Intercultural Pragmatics| Discourse Analysis|  Intercultural Communication| Anti-discrimination

 

Research Interests

Sprache in Migrationskontexten|Multimodale Interaktion|Sprache und Sport|Sprache und Gender |Multilingualismus|Perzeption und Diskriminierung ausländischer Akzente (Linguistic Profiling) 

 

Language in Migration Contexts|Multimodal Interaction|Language and Sports|Language, Gender and Queer Theory| Multilingualism| Linguistic Profiling

 

 

Research Projects

See closer descriptions in NEWS

See publications and further project descriptions on my researchgate profile

 

Covid-19 Humor: Memes and the pandemic across Gender and Generations

Online humor can be a constructive way of dealing with psychologically and socially difficult situations (Vazquez 2019). The Covid-19 pandemic has affected social actions and interactions drastically during the lockdown phase (Jetten et al 2020). New laws obliged and lead social actors to practice interaction rituals in a socially distanced way, such as purchasing goods (Mondada et al. 2020), panic buying, working at home or homeschooling children. This in turn also lead to a total exposure in family relationships or lack thereof, home office, online work and learning forms became common. Finally, the lockdown lead to the lack of grooming, dressing casually, wearing masks (Jetten et al 2020), weight gain, as well as social distancing in greetings (Katila, Gan, Goodwin 2020). 

We collected around 600 memes related to Covid 19 from German English linguistics students, their parents and grandparents to compare how online humor varied. The pre-analysis shows how repeating metaphorical concepts underlie multimodal creativity in which Covid 19 is the enemy and the everyday person is compared to action heroe/ines or overworked parents are represented as zombies.

This ongoing study investigates how memes emerged in the time of the lock down from April to June 2020 across time, gender, generations (the baby boomer generations, and generations x, y and z) and across different national languages (a subcorpus from Bangladesh is compiled). The memes are analyzed according to humor topics, humor categories and multimodal metaphor analysis. We further investigate how certain types of humor and humor topics are related to age and gender and the phase of the lockdown using Maxqda 2020. 

  

 

Literature:

Hu, Yuying (2020) A Corpus-based Comparative Research on Covid19 News Discourse Representation in Voice of America and China Daily. Paper presented at the CORPORA AND DISCOURSE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE 2020, 17-19 June, University of Sussex, UK

Jetten, J. (2020). Together apart: The psychology of Covid-19. Los Angeles: Sage Publications. 

Katila, J., Gan, Y., & Goodwin, M. H. (2020). Interaction rituals and ‘social distancing’: New haptic trajectories and touching from a distance in the time of COVID-19. Discourse Studies, 1461445620928213. 

Katila, J., Gan, Y., & Goodwin, M. H. (2020). Interaction rituals and ‘social distancing’: New haptic trajectories and touching from a distance in the time of COVID-19. Discourse Studies, 1461445620928213. 

Mondada, L., Bänninger, J., Bouaouina, S. A., Camus, L., Gauthier, G., Hänggi, P., .& Tekin, B. S. (2020) Human sociality in the times of the Covid19 pandemic: A systematic examination of change in greetings. Journal of Sociolinguistics.  

Vásquez, C. (2019). Language, creativity and humour online. London: Routledge. 

  

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